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History
12:21 am
Fri February 8, 2013

Walking Enthusiasts To Retrace Steps Of 1963 Kennedy March

Attorney General Robert F. "Bobby" Kennedy uses a bullhorn to address a crowd of demonstrators, June 14, 1963, at the Justice Department. Four months earlier he had walked 50 miles in one day to prove to his brother John that he could do it. His march helped make extreme walking and hiking popular activities.
AP

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 9:28 am

Fifty years ago this Saturday, U.S. Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy went for a walk — a 50-mile walk, to be exact — trudging through snow and slush from just outside Washington, D.C., all the way to Harper's Ferry, W.Va.

He had no preparation, and no training. And in spite of temperatures well below freezing, he wore Oxford loafers on his feet.

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Asia
12:20 am
Fri February 8, 2013

Outside The Big City, A Harrowing Sexual Assault In Rural India

Roopa, the pseudonym for a gang rape victim in rural India, is shown at her home in the state of Haryana. Police were reluctant to investigate initially and the community has ostracized her. But her family has stood by her as she presses the case.
Julie M. McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 5:58 pm

It began as an innocent Sunday outing to see the movie The Life of Pi. By the time the night was over, it had become a grisly gang rape that shocked the world.

Five men went on trial this week, charged with the rape and killing of a 23-year-old woman who died of the injuries she suffered when she was attacked on a bus as it moved through the streets of Delhi — an assault that ignited public outrage over the violence against women in the Indian capital.

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Planet Money
12:14 am
Fri February 8, 2013

How Happy Is America?

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 9:28 am

In recent years, Canada, France and Britain have added measures of citizen happiness to their official national statistics. The U.S. government is now considering adopting a happiness index as well.

This makes a certain amount of sense. Everything a government does — hiring soldiers, building bridges, providing pensions — is supposed to make citizens happy.

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StoryCorps
11:35 pm
Thu February 7, 2013

A Life Defined Not By Disability, But Love

Bonnie Brown with her daughter, Myra, 15. Despite Bonnie's disability, Myra says her mom is everything she needs from a parent.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 9:28 am

When Bonnie Brown was pregnant with her daughter, Myra, she says she felt a mix of joy and anxiety.

"I hadn't ever been pregnant before," she says. "I never had really an idea of how to take care of a baby."

Brown, who is intellectually disabled, works at Wendy's while raising Myra as a single mom. Despite her disability, she says she never felt like her daughter was too much to handle.

"I think because I'm different it might seem hard for me, but I was going to give it all I got no matter what," she tells Myra, now 15, during a visit to StoryCorps.

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Sports
9:04 pm
Thu February 7, 2013

Lawsuit, Investigation Loom Over Lance Armstrong

Talk show host Oprah Winfrey interviews Lance Armstrong on Jan. 14. Armstrong confessed to using performance-enhancing drugs to win the Tour de France, reversing more than a decade of denial.
George Burns/ Harpo Studios AP

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 4:41 am

There are more troubles for disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong.

A Texas-based promotions company sued the former cycling champion Thursday for more than $12 million, which was paid to Armstrong for several of his record seven Tour de France wins. Armstrong publicly admitted last month that those herculean victories were aided by doping.

The lawsuit is part of a flurry of activity: Armstrong still is in talks with the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, and there is now word that he is under federal investigation, a year after another federal criminal inquiry ended abruptly.

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