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1:59 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

For Many Florida Ex-Cons, Voting Booth Is Off-Limits

Richard Flores, 47, had his civil rights restored at a clemency board hearing on June 28. Convicted of vehicular manslaughter in 1994, he served one year of house arrest. He had been waiting since then to have his right to vote restored.
Michael Ciaglo News21

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 4:44 pm

Across the nation, the number of people who have lost the right to vote because of a felony conviction has grown dramatically in the past three decades. Currently, almost 6 million people don't have that right — and about 1.5 million of them live in Florida.

While some states are making it easier for felons to get their voting rights back, Florida has taken the opposite approach — and the path for former convicts trying to get those rights back is often an arduous one.

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The Two-Way
1:50 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Tibetan Farmer Is Eighth Protester To Self-Immolate This Month

The Tibetan Labrang Monastery in Gansu, northwestern China, is normally a place of tranquility. Now, it is also known for tragedy. Early this morning, a Tibetan farmer known as Dhondup headed to Labrang to perform the Buddhist ritual of walking around the monastery in prayer. Near the prayer hall inside the gold-roofed monastery, Dhondup lit himself ablaze in protest of Chinese rule in Tibet.

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Shots - Health News
1:37 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Drugs May Help More Americans Keep Hypertension Under Control

The use of multiple blood pressure medications may be helping some Americans bring their hypertension under control.
iStockphoto.com

With all the attention on meningitis, hantavirus, and West Nile virus outbreaks lately, it's worth remembering that regular old cardiovascular disease is still the number one

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It's All Politics
1:32 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

One More Time: Here's Where To Get Debate 'Fact Checks'

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 3:06 pm

While President Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney are debating tonight in Boca Raton, Fla., the fact checkers at news outlets and independent organizations will again be busy.

So for those who want to know where to go for their truth squadding:

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Law
1:24 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

What Happens After Jurors Get It Wrong?

Juror Anita Woodruff is haunted by her decision to help convict Santae Tribble of murder.
Carrie Johnson NPR

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 5:16 pm

About 300 people have been wrongfully convicted and exonerated in the U.S. thanks to DNA evidence. But overlooked in those stories are the accounts of jurors who unwittingly played a role in the injustice.

One of those stories is playing out in Washington, D.C., where two jurors who helped convict a teenager of murder in 1981 are now persuaded that they were wrong. They're dealing with their sense of responsibility by leading the fight to declare him legally innocent.

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