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2:04 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Can Science Plant Brain Seeds That Make You Vote?

Adam Cole NPR

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 4:03 pm

In 2008, just a few days before the Democratic presidential primary between Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton in Pennsylvania, a large group of Pennsylvania voters got a very unusual phone call.

It was one of those get-out-the-vote reminder calls that people get every election cycle, but in addition to the bland exhortations about the importance of the election, potential voters were asked a series of carefully constructed questions:

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The Two-Way
1:46 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Woman Accuses George Zimmerman Of Molesting Her For Years

George Zimmerman during a court hearing on June 29.
Joe Burbank AP

The case of George Zimmerman has taken a surprising turn today: In an audio tape released by prosecutors today, a woman accuses Zimmerman of molesting her for about a decade.

Zimmerman has been charged with second-degree murder in the killing of Trayvon Martin. Zimmerman has claimed he killed the unarmed 17-year-old in self-defense. But Martin's family and supporters allege Zimmerman racially profiled the African-American teenager and followed him despite a police dispatcher's advice not to do that.

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The Salt
1:44 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Some Athletes Reject High-Tech Sports Fuel In Favor Of Real Food

Some athletes are choosing water and real food instead of sports drinks and processed bars and gels.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu July 19, 2012 9:22 am

As the world's greatest athletes gear up for the 2012 Olympic Games in London this month, viewers like us are likely to see a spike in televised ads for sports drinks, nutritional bars, and energy gel — that goop that so many runners and cyclists suck from foil pouches.

Powerade, in fact, is the official sports drink of the 2012 Olympics, and if it's true what these kinds of ads imply, processed sports foods and neon-colored drinks are the stuff that gold medalists are made of.

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Middle East
1:39 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

A Syrian Defector Confronts A Sectarian Divide

Syria's ongoing fighting is increasingly a sectarian conflict with the majority Sunni Muslims facing off against the Alawites who make up most of the country's ruling elite. Here, government opponents rally in the northern town of Mareh on June 29.
Vedat Xhymshit AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 5:16 pm

The violence in Syria is increasingly being called a civil war, and it can also be called a sectarian war, because much of the fighting pits the majority Sunni Muslims against the minority Alawites who make up much of the country's leadership.

Yet not everyone fits neatly into a category. There are some Alawites who have joined the uprising.

One 30-year-old Alawite man, who doesn't want his name revealed, is nervous as he lights another cigarette and tells the story of how he came to side with the opposition and turned his back on the Alawite rulers.

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The Two-Way
1:38 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Kitty Wells, 'Queen Of Country,' Dead At Age 92

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 3:21 pm

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