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The Salt
1:56 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

A Second Helping Of Pie Week: How Pumpkin Pie Turned My Life Around

Pumpkin pie to the rescue?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 6:57 pm

Yes, we know, Pie Week is officially over, and we already commemorated your contributions to it with our Storify post on Friday. But one more irresistible pie story came across the transom that we just had to share.

So without further ado, here's NPR listener Marie Metivier-DeMasters' story about how pie changed her life, which we received by email and edited a bit for length and clarity:

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It's All Politics
1:40 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Taxes, Jobs And Jabs: Obama And Romney Slug It Out In Swing States

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 1:57 pm

President Obama campaigned in Iowa on Tuesday, promoting his plan to extend the Bush-era tax cuts for those who make under $250,000 a year — but not for more wealthy Americans.

Republican Mitt Romney was in another swing state, Colorado, hitting a new Republican charge that some of Obama's policies have helped create jobs overseas at the expense of the domestic job market.

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Poverty In America
1:25 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Poverty In The U.S. By The Numbers

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 11:54 am


Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
1:21 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Reports: Google, FTC Will Settle Over Safari Privacy Breach

According to several news report, Google and the Federal Trade Commission are close to reaching an agreement over charges of a privacy breach.

The Wall Street Journal reports that the tentative deal would have Google pay $22.5 million over charges that it bypassed the privacy settings of users of Apple's Safari web browser.

The Journal reports:

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Europe
1:12 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

'Vultures' Swoop In For Deals In Debt-Ridden Spain

A "For Sale" sign hangs outside mostly empty apartment blocks in the Madrid satellite town of Sesena in February. Banks are trying to sell billions of euros worth of property left by bankrupt developers. This is attracting bargain-hunting investors from abroad.
Andrea Comas Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 4:34 pm

Back in the day, Madrid's Palace Hotel was Ernest Hemingway's old haunt, or at least the bar was. Now, rooms at the posh hotel just down from the famed Prado Museum go for up to $6,000 a night. And gathering in its lobby these days? An altogether different type of foreigner: the kind in expensive suits.

"Probably they are institutional investors, hedge funds, sovereign wealth funds," says Federico Steinberg, an economist at Madrid's Elcano Institute.

There's a lot of cash around the world, he says, and a lot of people looking for bargains.

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