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National Security
11:48 am
Wed June 6, 2012

How The President Decides To Make Drone Strikes

For a new book, Kill or Capture, investigative reporter Dan Klaidman examined how President Obama came to embrace the drone program, and the closed-door process that determines under what circumstances drones are deployed. He talks about the administration's growing reliance on covert attacks.

Music Reviews
11:44 am
Wed June 6, 2012

Japandroids: One Part Classic Rock, One Part Punk

Japandroids is guitarist Brian King (left) and drummer David Prowse.
Simone Cecchetti

Originally published on Sat June 9, 2012 9:39 am

The rock band Japandroids is two men, not from Tokyo but from Vancouver, British Columbia — guitarist Brian King and drummer David Prowse. Both of them sang and very often shouted on their 2009 LP Post-Nothing, which received a lot of praise from music blogs. Their second album is out now; it's called Celebration Rock, and I think it's the best rock record I've heard this year.

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The Two-Way
11:41 am
Wed June 6, 2012

PHOTOS: The Enterprise Travels Up The Hudson River To Its New Home

The shuttle was navigated through Coney Island and Staten Island from Jersey City.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

The shuttle Enterprise made a incredible trip up the Hudson River by barge, today. The shuttle was framed by New York City's skyline and eventually it will be hoisted from the barge to its new home at the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum.

Here are some pictures from the Enterprise's journey:

Politics
11:22 am
Wed June 6, 2012

Walker's Victory Tests Progressives' Strength

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker survived his recall election, a victory that may signal trouble for Democrats at the national level come November. NPR's Political Junkie columnist Ken Rudin and Katrina Vanden Heuvel of The Nation talk about what Walker's victory means for progressives.

Monkey See
11:15 am
Wed June 6, 2012

Ray Bradbury: Finding Our Reflections Where We Didn't Expect Them

This 1966 file photo shows science fiction writer Ray Bradbury looking at a picture that was part of a school project to illustrate characters in one of his dramas.
AP

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 5:19 am

Heinlein, Asimov and Bradbury; they were the tripod (invasive, moving, with lasers) on which my science fiction education was built in the 1970s. This was somewhat self-selected, because once you — or I — grew out of Danny Dunn and Journey to the Mushroom Planet and Tom Swift, Jr., they were the inevitable destinations, the planets with the heaviest gravity wells in the sci-fi solar system.

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