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The Two-Way
1:18 pm
Mon November 28, 2011

Lana Peters, Stalin's Last Surviving Child, Has Died

The Associated Press and The New York Times report that Lana Peters, Josef Stalin's only daughter and his last surviving child, died last week at age 85. Peters was mainly known as the daughter of the Soviet tyrant, but her life was anything but simple: The evolution of her name says much about her efforts to escape the ignominy of her father. Peters was born Svetlana Stalina then changed her last name to Alliluyeva and later became Lana Peters.

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Music News
12:23 pm
Mon November 28, 2011

A Carnegie Hall Debut, Inspired By Trout

Ellen Taaffe Zwilich took her inspiration for the piece from Franz Schubert's famous Trout Quintet.
Bill Keefrey

The Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson Trio — pianist Joseph Kalichstein, violinist Jamie Laredo and cellist Sharon Robinson — will celebrate its 35th anniversary as one of the world's finest chamber-music ensembles this January. For the past 25 years, one of the group's frequent partners has been Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Ellen Taaffe Zwilich. She says it's always great fun to hand over a new piece.

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The Two-Way
12:22 pm
Mon November 28, 2011

A Kiss No More: Oscar Wilde's Tomb Will Be Protected From Smootches

Visitors to the grave of the Irish writer and poet Oscar Wilde won't be able to leave a permanent mark on his tomb anymore. Since the '90s, mostly women started leaving lipstick kisses on his tomb in Paris' Père Lachaise cemetery, a gentle memento for a writer who didn't show much regard for women.

The problem was that cleaning off those kisses was damaging the stone. The Guardian reports:

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Africa
12:22 pm
Mon November 28, 2011

In Egypt's Vote, Islamists Expect Strong Showing

Sobhi Saleh, right, a senior member of the Muslim Brotherhood and candidate for parliament, speaks to voters at a polling station in Alexandria, Egypt on Monday. The Brotherhood is expected to make a strong showing in the polls.
Tarek Fawzy AP

Dozens of veiled women tried to squeeze past each other Monday and into a polling station in the working-class neighborhood of Raml in the northern Egyptian city of Alexandria.

They were eager to cast ballots for a clean-shaven man in a crisp blue suit and matching tie.

His name is Sobhi Saleh and he heads the Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party ticket in three of Alexandria's districts. The party is considered the best organized in Egypt and is expected to do well in the country's first election since President Hosni Mubarak was toppled in February.

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All Tech Considered
12:16 pm
Mon November 28, 2011

Warmth In Winter: Smart Windows To Let Heat In

Researchers at the window testing facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory are developing nanocrystal technology. When activated by a small electrical current, it would allow light but not heat through.
Courtesy Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Originally published on Mon November 28, 2011 3:26 pm

When you think of high-tech gadgets that make us greener, you might picture solar panels or electric cars; windows may not seem as exciting. But buildings are responsible for 40 percent of the country's energy use, and researchers say they can lower that number by making windows smarter.

As someone who studies windows, Howdy Goudey isn't surprised that most of us find them a little boring.

"It's a pretty pedestrian object," he says. "You know, what's new to do with a window?"

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