Corey Dade

Corey Dade is a national correspondent for the NPR Digital News team. With more than 15 years of journalism experience, he writes news analysis about federal policy, national politics, social trends, cultural issues and other topics for NPR.org.

Prior to NPR, Dade served as the Atlanta-based southern politics and economics reporter at The Wall Street Journal for five years. During that time he covered many of the nation's biggest news stories, including the BP oil spill, the Tiger Woods scandal and the 2008 presidential election, having traveled with the Obama and McCain campaigns. He also covered the 2007 Virginia Tech shootings and Hurricane Katrina, which led to a nine-month special assignment in New Orleans.

At the Journal, Dade also told the stories at the intersection of politics, culture and commerce, such as the Obama presidency's potential to reframe race in America and the battle between African-American and Dominican hair salons for control of the billion-dollar black consumer market.

Dade began his reporting career at The Miami Herald, writing about curbside newspaper racks and other controversies roiling the retirement town of Hallandale, Fla., pop. 30,000. He later covered local and state politics at the Detroit Free Press, The Boston Globe and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

No stranger to radio, over the years Dade has been a frequent guest commentator and analyst on NPR news, talk and information programs and on several cable TV networks.

As a student at Grambling State University in Louisiana, Dade played football for legendary coach Eddie Robinson. He then transferred to his eventual alma mater, the University of Maryland.

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Election 2012
3:24 am
Sat January 28, 2012

Why New Photo ID Laws Mean Some Won't Vote

Stickers at a Nevada polling place on Election Day 2010.
Max Whittaker Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 28, 2012 9:55 am

The argument over whether voters should have to present photo identification at the polls usually splits along party lines. Republicans who favor the requirement say it prevents ballot fraud. Democrats and election rights groups who oppose it say it is meant to suppress turnout.

And people of all political stripes wonder what all the fuss is about.

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It's All Politics
11:28 am
Mon January 23, 2012

Candidates' Stance On Immigration Scrutinized Ahead Of Florida Primary

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney campaigns in Tampa, Fla., on Monday.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 24, 2012 3:44 am

The issue of immigration, which barely simmered during the first three Republican presidential contests, could reach a boil now that the candidates have arrived in Florida for the state's Jan. 31 primary.

Florida, with its large and influential Latino population, provides the earliest gauge of the difficulty facing any eventual GOP nominee in courting Hispanic voters, who increasingly view Republicans' rhetoric about immigration as anti-Hispanic.

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It's All Politics
8:46 am
Thu January 19, 2012

Perry Sees 'No Viable Path Forward': The Fall Of A Once Promising Front-Runner

Perry prepares to speak with voters attending the West Des Moines caucus in Iowa on Jan. 3.
Jonathan Gibby Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 19, 2012 11:40 am

Like the saying goes in his home state, everything about Texas Gov. Rick Perry's presidential campaign was big.

From the start of his candidacy, when he garnered instant front-runner status in some polls, to his embarrassing debate performances and his slide to the back of the pack, Perry's bid for the Republican nomination seemed outsized. So, too, were the expectations.

On Thursday, Perry left the GOP race and strongly endorsed former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, citing his "heart of a conservative reformer."

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Presidential Race
8:23 am
Mon January 16, 2012

Unable To Gain Traction, Jon Huntsman Drops Out

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, flanked by his wife, Mary Kaye, announced Monday at the Myrtle Beach Convention Center in South Carolina that he is ending his run for the Republican presidential nomination.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 16, 2012 8:57 am

Jon Huntsman billed himself as the Harley-riding, mild-mannered candidate of civility. But his moderate positions never registered with Republican primary voters and left him languishing in the polls.

Huntsman, 51, ended his bid for the Republican presidential nomination Monday after struggling to keep pace in a largely conservative field. He also failed to distinguish himself as the Mitt Romney alternative, unable to escape the shadow of the other millionaire former governor and Mormon in the race.

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It's All Politics
3:07 pm
Fri January 13, 2012

Obama's Most Vocal Black Critics Dial Back Attacks As Election Year Begins

Princeton professor Cornel West (right) and talk show host Tavis Smiley (left) on their 18-city poverty tour on Oct. 9, 2011.
JIM RUYMEN UPI /Landov

The dynamic duo of PBS host Tavis Smiley and professor/activist Cornel West was it again in Washington Thursday evening during a live television broadcast of a program addressing poverty.

The two have made a traveling roadshow out of their roles as the loudest African-American critics of President Obama.

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