Don Gonyea

In eastern North Carolina, residents who voted for President Trump are loyal to him. But it is not a blind loyalty.

When asked the simple question, "How is the president doing so far?" surprisingly, Trump supporters in Nash County often begin their response with what they don't like.

Eric Wyatt, a 21-year-old engineering student, was typical.

"I support what he's doing thus far," he said, before immediately adding, "I wish he wasn't such a blowhard."

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Outside of show business, the presidency is one of the few jobs that comes with its own song.

In a tradition dating back to the 1800s, when the commander in chief enters the room, the U.S. Marine Band strikes up "Hail to the Chief."

It started out a simple, human interest story featuring a former president and his post-White House hobby — painting watercolors of world leaders, and now, portraits of American soldiers, wounded during military service.

President Trump's status with the Conservative Political Action Conference has gone from "it's complicated" to a full-on committed relationship.

That turnaround was to be expected, given that the former reality TV star and billionaire businessman pulled off an unlikely upset last November that finally gave attendees at CPAC what they had been salivating over for more than a decade — control of the White House, Congress and a new conservative justice nominated to the Supreme Court.

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