Miles Bryan

Phone: 307-766-5086


Miles previously worked at American Public Media’s Marketplace and National Public Radio’s Los Angeles bureau. His work has appeared on NPR’s Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and on public radio stations across the Northwest. Miles grew up in Minneapolis. He moonlights as a rock guitarist.

Pocatello, Idaho, and Laramie, Wyo., might not be the first places you think of leading the charge to protect the LGBT community from discrimination. But in these rural, Republican-led states, local governments are taking the matter into their own hands.

Twenty-year-old college student CylieAnn Erickson was in the room when the city council in Laramie passed its LGBT anti-discrimination bill earlier this year. She says that when the final vote was counted, she breathed a sigh of relief.

Kimberley Enyart was never interested in doing recreational drugs. But then she was in a car accident — and her doctor prescribed a powerful opiate for the pain.

"It just would put me off in la-la land, and make me feel better," she says. "I loved it. I loved that high."

When Enyart's prescription ran out, she did whatever she could to convince other doctors that she needed more. Eventually, she moved on to dentists.

"I even had two back teeth pulled over it," she says.

Forrest Hampton is about to become a family man and he couldn't be happier. He's 25 and he lives in a suburb of Dallas with his fiancée, who's due to have their baby practically any minute. They've already picked out a name: Raven.

In most ways they are a normal family. Except for one thing. Until last year, Hampton was a registered sex offender.

"I honestly don't believe I was supposed to be registered in the first place," he says, "but I wasn't in the position to fight my case."

It's a beautiful day and Jeremy Smith, the business manager for a school district in northern Wyoming, is showing off the new Tongue River Elementary School — or at least the plot of land where the school should be.

"What you're going to see when you get up here a little bit closer is you are going to just see pasture," Smith says.

The school was supposed to be under construction by now, but last month state officials said they didn't have the money.