Philip Reeves

Philip Reeves is an award-winning veteran international correspondent based in Islamabad, Pakistan. Previous to his current role, he covered Europe out of NPR's bureau in London.

Reeves has spent two decades working as a journalist overseas, reporting from a wide range of places including the former Soviet Union, the Middle East and Asia.

A member of the NPR team that won highly prestigious Alfred I. duPont–Columbia University and George Foster Peabody awards for coverage of the conflict in Iraq, Reeves has been honored several times by the South Asian Journalists Association.

In 2010, Reeves moved to London from New Delhi after a stint of more than seven years working in and around South Asia. He traveled widely in India, taking listeners on voyages along the Ganges River and the ancient Grand Trunk Road. He also made numerous trips to cover unrest and political turmoil in Pakistan.

Reeves joined NPR in 2004, after spending 17 years as a correspondent for the British daily newspaper, The Independent. During the early stages of his career, he worked for BBC radio and television after training on the Bath Chronicle newspaper in western Britain.

Over the years, Reeves has covered a wide range of stories - from the Waco siege, to the growth of the Internet, Boris Yeltsin's erratic presidency, the economic rise of India, and conflicts in Gaza and the West Bank, Chechnya, Iraq, Afghanistan and Sri Lanka.

Graduating from Cambridge University, Reeves earned a degree in English literature. He and his wife have one daughter. His family originates from New Zealand.

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Parallels
12:25 am
Wed May 20, 2015

Live On Pakistani TV: A Call-In Show About Sex

Dr. Nadim Uddin Siddiqui hosts a weekly call-in show about sexual issues on a Pakistani cable television channel. The program, Clinic Online, is a rarity for a conservative Muslim nation, but has proved popular, particularly among women.
Abdul Sattar NPR

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 9:09 am

It's long been assumed that, in conservative Islamic societies, sex is a subject to be spoken about, if it's discussed at all, in guilty whispers.

Yet, for many months now, women in Pakistan have been dialing in to a TV show to ask about profoundly personal issues — live on air.

"I have to talk about my husband," said a woman who gave her name as Sonia on one of the show's recent editions. "His sperm count is very low ..."

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Middle East
4:51 am
Sun April 26, 2015

Pakistani Activists Mourn Slain Human Rights Proponent

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 4:42 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Asia
2:20 pm
Sun April 19, 2015

Chinese President To Discuss Massive Trade Route During Pakistan Visit

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 3:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Middle East
2:07 am
Fri April 10, 2015

Pakistan's Dilemma: Should It Assist Saudi Arabia In Yemen Operation?

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 4:56 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Parallels
5:09 am
Sun April 5, 2015

Will New Zealand Rebuild The Cathedral My Forefather Erected?

The badly damaged Christchurch Cathedral is pictured on Sept. 7, 2011 during a tour given to foreign journalists visiting the city ahead of the rugby 2011 World Cup. England rugby manager Martin Johnson and several members of the playing squad visited the city to see the stadium and the city center which were damaged by an earthquake in February.
Paul Ellis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 5, 2015 8:19 am

He has a swirl of graying whiskers stretching down to his collar, yet he wears a tiny mustache so precisely groomed that it almost could have been typed. His face is confident and stern, befitting a gentleman of substance.

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