Scott Detrow

Scott Detrow is a Congressional reporter for NPR. He also co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast.

Detrow joined NPR in 2015 to cover the presidential election. He focused on the Republican side of the 2016 race, spending time on the campaign trail with Donald Trump, and also reported on the election's technology and data angles.

Detrow worked as a statehouse reporter for member stations WITF in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and KQED in San Francisco, California. He has also covered energy policy for NPR's StateImpact project, where his reports on Pennsylvania's hydraulic fracturing boom won a DuPont-Columbia and national Edward R. Murrow Award in 2013.

Detrow got his start in public radio at Fordham University's WFUV. He graduated from Fordham, despite spending most of his time in the newsroom, and is also working toward completing a master's degree at the University of Pennsylvania's Fels Institute of Government.

The day after the deadliest mass shooting in American history, presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton warned against the possibility of future attacks and went after Donald Trump for "inflammatory" rhetoric.

"The threat is metastasizing," Clinton said in a speech in Cleveland. "We saw this in Paris, and we saw it in Brussels. We face a twisted ideology and poisoned psychology that inspires the so-called lone wolves: radicalized individuals who may or may not have contact and direction from any formal organization."

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It is the worst mass shooting in American history. At least 50 people are dead, and 53 more have been sent to area hospitals. Joining us now for the latest on this story is NPR's Scott Detrow. Scott, thanks so much for speaking with us.

Hillary Clinton channeled a little bit of Donald Trump in San Diego on Thursday afternoon, delivering a blistering attack on her likely Republican opponent's qualifications to run the country.

"Making Donald Trump our commander in chief would be a historic mistake," Clinton told a cheering, and at times laughing, audience.

Picture this. An email pops into your inbox. It promises to help you "make some real money and live the kind of life that you thought was only for 'rich' people." To help you "spend your life living it your way."

The pitch sounds promising, because it's December 2008, and the economy has collapsed all around you.

Donald Trump has broken rule after rule on his way to becoming the presumptive Republican presidential nominee.

Now, Trump may be ready to break another.

High-tech data operations have become a mainstay of presidential campaigns over the past two decades.

But Trump recently told an interviewer that he sees data as "overrated."

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

I'm Ari Shapiro, and it's time for All Tech Considered.

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#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

From Political Reporter Scott Detrow:

For many people interested in policy and politics, Robert Caro's The Power Broker is a sort of bible.

Hillary Clinton snagged another endorsement over the weekend, but don't expect her to trumpet it on the campaign trail.

"I have a little announcement to make ... I'm voting for Hillary. I am endorsing Hillary," noted conservative author P.J. O'Rourke said on NPR's Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me. The episode aired over the weekend.

Donald Trump could solidify his position as the Republican Party's all-but-certain nominee with a win in Indiana Tuesday.

Ted Cruz is hoping an endorsement from Indiana Gov. Mike Pence could help him buck recent polls and carry the Hoosier State.

It took them nearly two months to do so, but John Kasich and Ted Cruz are finally taking Mitt Romney's advice.

When the 2012 Republican nominee lambasted front-runner Donald Trump in March, he called for a strategic effort to stop the New York businessman.

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