Scott Horsley

Scott Horsley is a White House correspondent for NPR News. He reports on the policy and politics of the Obama Administration, with a special emphasis on economic issues.

The 2012 campaign is the third presidential contest Horsley has covered for NPR. He previously reported on Senator John McCain's White House bid in 2008 and Senator John Kerry's campaign in 2004. Thanks to this experience, Horsley has become an expert in the motel shampoo offerings of various battleground states.

Horsley took up the White House beat after serving as a San Diego-based business correspondent for NPR where he covered fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley was a reporter for member station KPBS-FM, where he received numerous honors, including a Public Radio News Directors' award for coverage of the California energy crisis.

Earlier in his career, Horsley worked as a reporter for WUSF-FM in Tampa, Florida, and as a news writer and reporter for commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University.

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Politics
2:02 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Survey: Americans Are Grumpy About Economic Recovery

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 4:20 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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2:15 pm
Fri August 22, 2014

For Obama, August Is The Cruelest Month

President Obama plays golf on the island of Martha's Vineyard in Massachusetts on Thursday.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Sat August 23, 2014 4:18 pm

President Obama returns to Washington this weekend after a two-week family vacation.

It wasn't exactly restful. The break was interrupted several times by events in Iraq and in Ferguson, Mo.

On Wednesday, Obama raised eyebrows by hitting the golf course, minutes after delivering a tough statement on the murder of an American journalist by militants from the Islamic State.

You know it's bad is when even the French are criticizing you for taking too much time off.

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Politics
12:36 am
Wed August 20, 2014

With Ferguson, Obama Forced To Confront Race Yet Again

President Obama meets with Attorney General Eric Holder in the Oval Office of the White House on Monday. Holder is traveling to Ferguson, Mo., where a federal investigation is under way in the police shooting of Michael Brown, a black teenager who was unarmed.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Wed August 20, 2014 8:52 am

The tense situation in Ferguson, Mo., following the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown is another test for President Obama. He has struggled at times over how to navigate long-simmering tensions between police and the African-American community.

Obama says he understands the passions and the anger that have engulfed Ferguson over the past week and a half, but he has carefully avoided taking sides. His warnings against violent confrontation have been directed equally at the protesters and the police.

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Politics
1:16 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Obama Suspends Summer Vacation To Debrief On Issues At Home And Abroad

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 3:18 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
2:14 pm
Fri August 15, 2014

Left And Right Unite In Criticizing Ferguson Police Response

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon speaks during a news conference in St. Louis. Nixon ordered the Missouri State Highway Patrol to take over the supervision of security in Ferguson.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Fri August 15, 2014 6:50 pm

The police response to this week's protests in Ferguson, Mo., has been criticized on both sides of the aisle as heavy-handed.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon — a two-term Democrat — ordered an overnight change in police tactics. He brought in state troopers, who walked side-by-side with demonstrators.

"This is a place where people work, go to school, raise their families and go to church. A diverse community. A Missouri community. But lately it's looked more like a war zone, and that's unacceptable," he said at a press conference Thursday.

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