Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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It's All Politics
6:51 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Romney Campaign Official: We Could Win Without Florida

There are lots of ways to get to 270 and they don't all involve Florida's 29 electoral votes, according to Rich Beeson, the national political director for the Mitt Romney Campaign.

Beeson, speaking with Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep on Tuesday, says the Sunshine State would be nice to have in the red column, but it's not a sine qua non for clinching victory in November.

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Sports
2:55 pm
Fri August 24, 2012

Can Livestrong Survive Armstrong's Fall?

The ubiquitous Livestrong wristband was introduced in 2004 and quickly became a cultural icon.
Joel Saget AFP/Getty Images

Lance Armstrong may soon be stripped of his seven Tour de France titles, but many supporters are sticking by him — if not as the celebrity cyclist, then as the relentless advocate for cancer survivors.

That's encouraging news for his Livestrong foundation, which must deal with the delicate matter of a scandal-tainted figurehead.

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Health
11:01 am
Sun August 19, 2012

Dallas Deploys Old Weapon In New Mosquito Fight

Mike Stuart of Dynamic Aviation speaks to the media this week about the type of plane used for aerial spraying in Dallas. The city and county are conducting aerial spraying to combat the nation's worst outbreak of West Nile virus, which has killed at least 10 people and sickened about 200.
LM Otero AP

The recent outbreak of West Nile virus in the Dallas area has led to a new round of large-scale spraying for mosquitoes — a method of treating outbreaks that has generations of success, and even nostalgia, behind it.

Although the overall mosquito-killing strategy has changed little since the days when it was pioneered during construction of the Panama Canal a century ago, the chemicals used have become much safer for everything and everyone involved, save the mosquitoes, experts say.

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Space
7:03 am
Thu August 9, 2012

Man On The Moon: Saving America's 'One Small Step'

Apollo 17 commander Eugene A. Cernan takes a Lunar Roving Vehicle for a spin at the Taurus-Littrow landing site during the 1972 mission.
Harrison H. Schmitt NASA

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 3:57 am

It wasn't that long ago the United States owned the moon, or at least it seemed that way.

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Religion
1:44 pm
Mon August 6, 2012

U.S. Sikhs Increasingly Targeted For Violence

Members of the Milwaukee-area Sikh community gather Monday in Oak Creek, Wis., to learn more information about a shooting spree that left six people dead. Sikhs have faced a number of attacks in the U.S. in recent years.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 5:48 am

As Sikhism spread far and wide in the past century, it has been no stranger to discrimination and violence.

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