All Things Considered on KAZU

Weekdays, 3pm- 5:30pm
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block

All Things Considered Homepage: Click Here

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Krista Almanzan with Traffic Reports and Weather Updates
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182876ce1c87aff5c76b387|51828747e1c87aff5c76b32b

Pages

The Salt
3:29 pm
Sat December 20, 2014

Want To Enhance The Flavor Of Your Food? Put On The Right Music

Researchers at the University of Oxford have been looking for a link between sound and taste.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat December 20, 2014 3:40 pm

Here's an experiment: take a bite of whatever food you have nearby and listen to some music, something with high notes. Now, take another bite, but listen to something with low notes.

Notice anything?

Researchers at the University of Oxford have been looking for a link between sound and taste. They've found that higher-pitched music — think flutes — enhances the flavor of sweet or sour foods. Lower-pitched sounds, like tubas, enhance the bitter flavors.

Read more
Food
2:16 pm
Sat December 20, 2014

How Tinseltown Got Tipsy: A Boozy Taste Of Hollywood History

iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat December 20, 2014 3:40 pm

If the bars of Los Angeles could talk, they'd have an awful lot of tales to tell — old Hollywood was full of famously hard drinkers. And while LA's watering holes are keeping their secrets, one author, Mark Bailey, has uncorked a slew of stories from the city's plastered past.

Read more
Latin America
2:06 pm
Sat December 20, 2014

Renewed U.S.-Cuba Ties Could Mean Big Things For Cigar Market

Originally published on Sat December 20, 2014 3:40 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Think Cuba, think cigars. David Savona is the executive editor of Cigar Aficionado magazine. David, welcome to the program.

DAVID SAVONA: Thanks, glad to be here.

Read more
Latin America
2:06 pm
Sat December 20, 2014

What Do Cubans Think Of Renewed U.S. Relations?

Originally published on Sat December 20, 2014 3:40 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
2:06 pm
Sat December 20, 2014

Montana Shooter Found Guilty Despite State's 'Castle Doctrine'

Diren Dede, a 17-year-old German exchange student, was fatally shot in the head and arm when he entered the garage of Markus Kaarma in Missoula, Montana, on April 27. Kaarma claimed it was self-defense, but a Montana jury recently found him guilty of deliberate homicide.
Oliver Hardt Getty Images

Originally published on Sat December 20, 2014 3:40 pm

More than 30 states have laws that allow people to use deadly force if they have a reasonable fear for their life or property. But this week, a Montana jury said that type of law has its limits, finding a homeowner who shot a teenager in his garage guilty of deliberate homicide.

In the early hours of April 27, a motion detector alerted homeowner Markus Kaarma someone was in the garage of his home in Missoula, Mont. He went outside and almost immediately fired four shotgun blasts, killing 17-year-old Diren Dede, a German exchange student.

Read more

Pages