All Things Considered on KAZU

Weekdays, 3pm- 5:30pm
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block

All Things Considered Homepage: Click Here

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Krista Almanzan with Traffic Reports and Weather Updates
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182876ce1c87aff5c76b387|51828747e1c87aff5c76b32b

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Reporter's Notebook
1:31 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

For Liberian Youth, A Creative Outlet In Krumping

Franklyn Dunbar, 17, practices krumping with his crew at his mother's house in Paynesville, a suburb of Monrovia, Liberia. Dunbar was born in New York, but moved to his home country of Liberia seven years ago.
Tamasin Ford NPR

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 3:39 pm

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Shots - Health Blog
1:25 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Medicaid Helps Washington, D.C., Clinic Care For Ex-Prisoners

A Unity Health Care patient gets his ears checked.
Unity Health Care

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 3:39 pm

Dr. Ilse Levin specializes in internal medicine, but you could say she really focuses on incarceration medicine.

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Science
1:16 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

What Drove Early Man Across Globe? Climate Change

An artist's re-creation of the first human migration to North America from across the Bering Sea.
DEA Picture Library De Agostini/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 3:39 pm

Anthropologists believe early humans evolved in Africa and then moved out from there in successive waves. However, what drove their migrations has been a matter of conjecture.

One new explanation is climate change.

Anthropologist Anders Erikkson of Cambridge University in England says the first few hardy humans who left Africa might've gone earlier but couldn't. Northeastern Africa — the only route to Asia and beyond — was literally a no man's land.

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The Salt
1:09 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Shriveled Mich. Apple Harvest Means Fewer Jobs, Tough Year Ahead

A lonely Michigan apple.
Noah Adams NPR

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 11:42 am

An apple a day might keep the doctor away, but what do you do when there are no apples? It's a question western Michigan's apple growers are dealing with this season after strange weather earlier in the year decimated the state's apple cultivation.

Michigan is the third-largest apple producer in the U.S. after New York and Washington, but the state's apples will soon be in short supply. Now in the middle of harvest season, growers are picking only 10 percent to 15 percent of their normal crop.

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The Picture Show
8:29 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Same Camera, Different Century: Capturing Civil War Sites, 150 Years Later

Here's a snapshot from the field as Harrington composed his image of Burnside Bridge — which involved schlepping the huge, fragile camera down a steep incline to get the right perspective.
Claire O'Neill (@clairevoyant) Instagram

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 3:39 pm

Believe it or not, there's a lot of food involved in wet-plate photography. Egg whites (albumen) are used to make the glass plates adhesive to the light-sensitive chemicals. And one way to keep the plates from drying out after processing is to coat them in honey. It's also physically demanding, so you get really hungry.

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