All Things Considered on KAZU

Weekdays, 3pm- 5:30pm
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block

All Things Considered Homepage: Click Here

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Host(s): 
Krista Almanzan with Traffic Reports and Weather Updates
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
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It's All Politics
2:36 pm
Mon August 13, 2012

Favored In GOP Senate Primary, Linda McMahon Faces Critics Left And Right

Connecticut GOP Senate candidates Rep. Christopher Shays and Linda McMahon shake hands at a June 14 debate in Storrs. State Republicans vote Tuesday on which candidate will move on to the general election.
Stephan Savoia AP

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 3:12 pm

Two years ago, Republican Linda McMahon ran for an open U.S. Senate seat in Connecticut, spent $50 million of her own money in the process, and lost.

In an otherwise Republican year, the former top executive at World Wrestling Entertainment was easily beaten by Democrat Richard Blumenthal.

Now, McMahon is trying again — running for the seat of outgoing Sen. Joe Lieberman, an independent.

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Remembrances
1:38 pm
Mon August 13, 2012

'Cosmo' Editor Helen Gurley Brown Dies At 90

When Helen Gurley Brown took the reins at Cosmo in 1965, it was a foundering monthly known for fiction. She remained at the helm for more than 30 years. Here, Brown poses at her office in New York in September 1985.
G. Paul Burnett AP

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 2:22 pm

Helen Gurley Brown, the longtime editor of Cosmopolitan magazine, died Monday in New York at age 90.

If Cosmo was her biggest legacy, it was her 1962 best-seller, Sex and the Single Girl, that launched her to fame. She was 40, with a high-paying job in advertising and a recent marriage to Hollywood producer David Brown.

But she was writing for the single girls, not her privileged peers, says Jennifer Scanlon, author of a Brown biography called Bad Girls Go Everywhere.

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Music Reviews
1:21 pm
Mon August 13, 2012

Debo Band: Ethiopian Funk, Reinvented

The debut album from Boston group Debo Band honors and updates the sound of "swinging Addis."
Shawn Brackbill

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 3:09 pm

Boston's Debo Band takes inspiration from a golden era of popular music in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in the late '60s and early '70s. During a brief period of cultural freedom in Ethiopia, funk and soul music fused spectacularly with local traditions. Debo Band's debut album both honors and updates the sound of "swinging Addis."

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PG-13: Risky Reads
1:03 pm
Mon August 13, 2012

Wicked And Delicious: Devouring Roald Dahl

cover detail

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 3:09 pm

D.W. Gibson is the author of Not Working: People Talk About Losing a Job and Finding Their Way in Today's Changing Economy.

The bright white Heritage Park library opened up a mile from my house when I was 13, and the first thing I checked out was Roald Dahl's story collection Someone Like You. I should have known what I was in for because of that giant eyeball on the cover; but somehow I saw it as more of a temptation than a warning.

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Middle East
11:55 am
Mon August 13, 2012

On Call-In Radio, Egypt's Leader Offers Reassurance

Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi (right) speaks to the media on Aug. 6 in El Arish, Egypt. He has already been engaging with the public more regularly than his predecessor.
AP

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 4:18 pm

When it comes to connecting with the Egyptian public, the country's new president, Mohammed Morsi, seems to have looked at what his predecessor did, and then plotted a course that is diametrically opposed.

During three decades of rule, the former president, Hosni Mubarak, would sometimes go months without making a public statement. When he did appear, it was almost always a formal presentation that seemed to emphasize the gulf between the leader and the ruled.

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