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Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse.Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Fine Art
11:49 pm
Sun May 6, 2012

The Serious Comic Art Of Daniel Clowes

Artist Daniel Clowes says Enid, the cantankerous heroine of Ghost World, would probably hate the book she stars in.
Daniel Clowes Oakland Museum of California

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 8:09 am

Comics used to be seen as cheap throwaway entertainment for children and teenagers. But over the last few decades, comics have grown up; they're even released in longer formats, on nice paper with hard covers, as graphic novels.

Daniel Clowes is one of the artists cited for turning the form into serious art — in fact, the art has gotten so serious that his work is now in a museum. Clowes is one of the best-known comic artists working today, with two of his books made into Hollywood films: the Academy Award-nominated Ghost World and Art School Confidential.

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Around the Nation
4:10 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Usual Flower Is MIA At Michigan Tulip Festival

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 6:57 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Space
4:06 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Photographers, Skywatchers Prepare For Supermoon

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 6:57 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Business
3:37 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 6:57 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with Facebook frenzy.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: The world's largest social networking site is going public later this month. And yesterday it set a price range for its stock. It plans to sell share shares for between $28 and $35 each, using the ticker symbol FB. The share sale is expected to raise as much as $12 billion, making it one of the largest initial public offerings ever.

Business
3:37 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Game Giant Forced To Play Catch UP

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 6:57 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

Video game fans hear this often. EA Sports, it's in the game. Well, now America's largest game publisher is trying to stay in the game. EA, Electronic Arts, built a gaming empire with a strategy straight out of Hollywood - big names and big budgets. But the market is changing. For one thing, more players now prefer games you can play online. And so the Silicon Valley company has been forced to change as well. KQED's Aarti Shahani reports.

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