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Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse.Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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NPR Story
1:27 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Encore: 'Fosters' Puts A Twist On The Old Family Drama

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 4:07 am

A new show on ABC Family follows a family with one biological kid, two adopted kids and a new addition, a teenage foster kid. Given how fostering is such an inherently dramatic situation, why hasn't this ever been the premise of a TV show before? (This story originally aired on All Things Considered on June 3, 2013.)

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NPR Story
1:27 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Mali Holds First Vote Following Unrest

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 4:07 am

Linda Wertheimer talks with Rukmini Callimachi, West Africa bureau chief for The Associated Press, about Sunday's elections in Mali, the first democratic vote there since French troops pushed Islamist militants out of the north of that country.

NPR Story
1:27 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Hunger Strikes Lead To Changes In California Prison Units

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 4:07 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It is the toughest unit in the toughest prison in California and one of the toughest in the country. The security housing unit at Pelican Bay prison is home to convicts who, along with their largely violent crimes, are suspected of being part of California's ruthless prison gangs, gangs that hurt and kill in prison and control all kinds of illegal activity inside.

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Energy
12:00 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Massive Solar Plant A Stepping Stone For Future Projects

The Ivanpah solar project in California's Mojave Desert will be the largest solar power plant of its kind in the world.
Josh Cassidy KQED

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 9:33 am

The largest solar power plant of its kind is about to turn on in California's Mojave Desert.

The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System will power about 140,000 homes and will be a boon to the state's renewable energy goals, but it was no slam dunk. Now, California is trying to bring conservationists and energy companies together to create a smoother path for future projects.

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Around the Nation
12:00 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Miami Beach Preservationists Battle Glitterati Over Homes

This house owned by a plastic surgeon and his wife, a cast member on The Real Housewives of Miami, is the poster child for efforts to stop runaway demolitions in Miami Beach.
Courtesy of Arthur Marcus

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 9:35 am

Some of Miami Beach's quietest and most historic neighborhoods can be found in a chain of small islands connected by a causeway. On Di Lido Island, a community of homes built 50 and 60 years ago is being torn down and replaced, lot by lot. On one street alone, five houses currently are slated for demolition.

Daniel Ciraldo stands across the street from two '60s-era houses that will soon be demolished and replaced by a new home nearly double their combined size.

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