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Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse.Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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NPR Story
2:17 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Why People Exaggerate Religious Behavior

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 4:54 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene. Social scientists have learned over the years that they can't always trust what people tell them. Ask about their behavior and some people lie - even to themselves. You have to compare what people say to some measurement of what they actually do. That's what researchers did when looking at religious behavior in three parts of the Muslim world. Our colleague Steve Inskeep discussed this with NPR's Shankar Vedantam.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Around the Nation
4:54 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Police Dispatcher Listens To Burglary In Progress

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 5:02 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Around the Nation
4:54 am
Wed April 9, 2014

1969 Birthday Greeting Arrives Decades Late

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 5:02 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene with a birthday message that might have grown sweeter with age.

A man residing on East 12th Street in Brooklyn recently received a letter postmarked in 1969. It was addressed to Susan Heifetz, who'd lived at the apartment with her family as a child. The letter wished her a happy 19th birthday. When the man contacted Heifetz, she asked if there was any sign of who it came from. On the back there was a lipstick mark. Her late mother did like to seal letters with a kiss.

NPR Story
3:40 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Tax Preparers Often Get Returns Wrong

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 5:02 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

We'll begin NPR's business news with a tax audit.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: Tax Day is less than a week away, everyone. And the Government Accountability Office just examined the work of 19 paid tax preparers - 17 got things wrong. Things like, failing to report tips as income or mistakenly applying certain tax credits.

Education
2:10 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Common Core Literary Standards Require Close Reading

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 5:02 am

Transcript

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