Morning Edition on KAZU

Mon - Fri, 4am - 9am
Steve Inskeep in Washington D.C. and Renee Montagne in Los Angeles

Marketplace Morning Report at 4:51, 5:51 & 8:51am
Your California Legacy at 6:33am
The California Report at 6:50am
The EnvironMinute at 7:33am

Morning Edition Homepage: Click Here


Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse.Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Host(s): 
David Wittrock with Traffic Reports & Weather updates
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182876ce1c87aff5c76b38c|51828747e1c87aff5c76b32b

Pages

The Salt
12:24 am
Mon November 12, 2012

To Get Around Tax Hike, Spanish Theater Sells Carrots Not Tickets

At the Bescanó municipal theater in northeastern Spain, director Quim Marcé (center) and actresses Meritxell Yanes (left) and Elena Martinell (right) display carrots for sale.
Quim Marcé

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 2:41 pm

In Spain, new austerity measures mean higher sales tax on everything from beer and wine to clothing and movie tickets. But in Bescanó, a small town in the country's northeast, the local theater director has come up with a rather creative way to get around a new 21 percent tax on tickets for plays at his theater –- by selling carrots instead.

Read more
NPR Story
9:35 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Boehner: To Avert Fiscal Cliff, Kill Tax Loopholes

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 9:46 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here in Washington, House Speaker John Boehner addressed a major economic issue this morning. In a press conference, the Republican talked about the so-called fiscal cliff. That's the combination of higher tax rates and spending cuts due to take effect at the end of this year.

Read more
Africa
4:51 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Woman In Kenya Names Her Twins Obama, Mitt

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 9:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. In his acceptance speech, the president said he would reach out to his Republican rival. And for sure, the future holds brotherly love for Barack and Mitt - in Kenya. That country has long embraced Barack Obama as one of its own, but this week a young mother seems to have caught the spirit of reconciliation. On Wednesday, Millicent Owuor gave birth to twin boys, and she named them Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
4:42 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Election Lesson: Why Every Vote Counts

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 9:46 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Business
1:28 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Sandy's Effects 'Staggering' To New York's Economy

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 9:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The governor of New York, Andrew Cuomo, also held a press conference yesterday, and gave a warning that Sandy could end up costing his state $33 billion in economic damage, which could worsen the state's already-perilous fiscal situation.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

JIM ZARROLI, BYLINE: Cuomo said the initial estimates are that the storm will cost the region $50 billion in lost economic activity and infrastructure damage. And he said two-thirds of that will be borne by New York.

Read more

Pages