Science Friday on KAZU

Friday 11am - 2pm
  • Hosted by Ira Flatow

Science Friday

Science Friday is your trusted source for news and entertaining stories about science. We started as a radio show, created in 1991 by host and executive producer Ira Flatow. Since then, we’ve grown into much more: We produce award-winning digital videos and publish original web content covering everything from octopus camouflage to cooking on Mars. SciFri is brain fun, for curious people.  The radio show is broadcast on many public radio stations Fridays from 2-4 p.m. Eastern Time. You can join the conversation by calling 1-844-724-8255 or tweeting us your questions @scifri.

Seawater in the pores? It’s what made Roman concrete great.

1 hour ago
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Muhammad Hamed/Reuters

The ancient Romans mastered concrete more than 2,000 years ago and used it to build piers, breakwaters and other structures. Despite the batterings of time and seawater, some of those structures still stand today.

In fact, their concrete has grown stronger over time — the result, scientists now say, of complex interactions between seawater and volcanic ash used in the mortar.

The kilogram is getting a new look

Jul 23, 2017
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<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MassStandards_005.jpg">National Institute of Standards and Technology</a>

For over a century, we’ve been using the same object to define the kilogram: a pingpong-ball-size chunk of platinum-iridium kept in Paris under lock and key. That will soon change.

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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/7163119505/in/album-72157623343484405/">NASA/Kathryn Hansen</a>. <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>&nbsp;(image cropped)

It’s 2017. What does a scientist look like?

If the first image that popped into your head was an older man with frizzy hair and a white lab coat, surrounded by bubbling test tubes, you’re not wrong — the Einsteinlike “mad scientist” is still a prevailing image in popular culture.

Does your sunscreen make the grade?

Jul 22, 2017
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<a href="https://unsplash.com/photos/mNCFOaaLu5o">David Lezcano</a> via <a href="https://unsplash.com/license">Unsplash</a>.&nbsp;

In the United States, sunscreen use is on the rise — but so are skin cancer cases. What’s going on?

As it turns out, it could come down to the types of sunscreen we’re using. In a recent test of nearly 1,500 sunscreens, moisturizers and lip balms that advertised sun protection, scientists at the Environmental Working Group (EWG) found that 73 percent of the products don’t provide the protection consumers think they’re getting, or they contain questionable ingredients.

Particles Behaving Badly

Jul 22, 2017

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