Science Friday on KAZU

Friday 11am - 2pm
  • Hosted by Ira Flatow

Science Friday

Science Friday is your trusted source for news and entertaining stories about science. We started as a radio show, created in 1991 by host and executive producer Ira Flatow. Since then, we’ve grown into much more: We produce award-winning digital videos and publish original web content covering everything from octopus camouflage to cooking on Mars. SciFri is brain fun, for curious people.  The radio show is broadcast on many public radio stations Fridays from 2-4 p.m. Eastern Time. You can join the conversation by calling 1-844-724-8255 or tweeting us your questions @scifri.

Big Trouble Managing Mustangs

Oct 7, 2017

The World Of Bitcoin Economics

Oct 7, 2017

A Homecoming For The Whales

Oct 7, 2017

Science Club Challenge: Grab A Neat Rock

Oct 7, 2017

Got Neanderthal DNA?

Oct 7, 2017
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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/philip-ester/5216780198">StingrayPhil</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>&nbsp;(image cropped)

You may not envy what dung beetles and carrion beetles dine on, but you live in a world that they help keep clean. Think of the insects as “nature’s recyclers,” decomposing waste and returning all kinds of nutrients back into the ecosystem.

At a recent live show in Wichita, Kansas, Science Friday host Ira Flatow talked with Rachel Stone and Emmy Engasser, graduate researchers at Wichita State University’s biodiversity lab, about this powerful natural cleanup crew. Here are some surprising takeaways from their conversation:

How scientists are piecing together the story of ancient Americans

Oct 1, 2017
C
<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Clovis_Rummells_Maske.jpg">Bill Whittaker</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0">CC BY-SA 3.0</a>&nbsp;(image cropped)&nbsp;

The Americas were one of the last areas of the world to be settled by modern humans, and we know that one of the first migrant groups, known as the Clovis people, lived here around 13,000 years ago.

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