The World on KAZU

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PRI’s The World is a one-hour, weekday radio news magazine offering a mix of news, features, interviews, and music from around the globe. Launched in 1996, PRI’s The World, a co-production of WGBH/Boston, PRI, and the BBC World Service, airs weekdays on over 300 stations across the country.

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The World
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As Russian President Vladimir Putin prepares for his first one-on-one summit with President Donald Trump in Helsinki next week, Russian political observers say Kremlin expectations are low but for one key deliverable: Russia’s symbolic return from international isolation to a global powerbroker America needs to negotiate with once more. 

Ahead of the summit, Trump — currently amid a contentious week of meetings with traditional US allies in Brussels and London — has suggested his talks with the Russian leader “may be the easiest of them all.”

Bacita De La Rosa says no one in Tacloban was prepared for Typhoon Haiyan’s intensity as it bore down on this coastal Philippine city in November 2013.

She recalls how her family thought they’d be safe inside their two-story home of concrete and corrugated steel that overlooks Anibong Bay. But the Category 5 storm, known locally as Yolanda, produced sustained wind speeds up to 195 mph that tore the roof off their hillside home.

In small English towns like Ramsgate, the job of mayor is mostly a ceremonial one. The leader is not supposed to be mucking about in politics. 

But Trevor Shonk, mayor of the town about 80 miles east of London, could not help himself. “Good luck to Trump” was one of the first things he told me over the phone.  

Mayor Shonk graciously welcomed me to Ramsgate on short notice, showed me around town and gave me advice on the best pubs to catch the England-Croatia soccer match on Wednesday night.  

When a 14-year-old Paraguayan girl died in childbirth in March, people flooded the streets.

Just how big of a waste problem are plastic straws?

Consider this: Each year, the Ocean Conservancy organizes its International Coastal Cleanup day. “In 2017, we collected over 600,000 straws off the beach,” says Emily Woglom, executive vice president with the Ocean Conservancy.

A big problem is that straws aren’t really recyclable.

It’s been two months now since the US moved its embassy to Jerusalem. The embassy opened May 14 to official fanfare while dozens died the same day along the Israel-Gaza border. More than 130 have been killed since protests began on March 30 and have continued for months.

Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy had a hand in some of the most important environmental law cases in recent history.

“He’s been on the court just over 30 years and he’s been in the majority in every single environmental case but one. You don’t win without Kennedy,” Harvard law professor Richard Lazarus told The Atlantic after Kennedy’s retirement.

The government agency that handles US citizenship applications has been using newly digitized fingerprints to investigate cases of fraud since the beginning of 2017. So far, one person’s citizenship has been revoked.

Davinder Singh came to the US on a fall day in 1991.

Sandy González-García looked like any other 8-year-old Friday, blowing out the candles on a Frozen-themed birthday cake.

You’d never suspect she spent her real birthday in a shelter on the other side of the country with other kids deemed unaccompanied minors by the government. Many of them, like her, were separated from their parents by the US government.

During spring negotiations at the World Health Assembly in Geneva, the US delegation threatened Ecuador and other countries with punitive trade measures if they didn't water down language in a resolution to "protect, promote and support breastfeeding," The New York Times reported

The US delegation, pressured by infant formula manufacturers, ultimately failed when Russia instead introduced the measure after more than a dozen other countries backed off. 

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