CEMEX

Gary Griggs, Ph.D, UC Santa Cruz

For nearly 50 years the Lapis Sand Mine in Marina has been operating without the required lease from the state.

Last March the California Coastal Commission told CEMEX that its sand mine in Marina violates the Coastal Act.  A year later, the plant is still up and running while drawn out talks between the two continue. 

Erika Mahoney

For more than a century a cement plant defined the small, coastal community of Davenport. In fact, the town just north of Santa Cruz was built to house its workers. Now seven years after the plant shutdown, residents are again looking to the plant to define their town.  

The last coastal sand mining plant in the nation remains open in Marina.  It has operated largely unregulated for decades. Then nearly a year ago, the California Coastal Commission put the CEMEX Sand Mine on notice, saying it violates the Coastal Act.   

The two have been in negotiations ever since.  In the meantime, those who want to see the mine shutdown are keeping a watchful eye on operations.

COPYRIGHT (C) 2002-2016 KENNETH & GABRIELLE ADELMAN, CALIFORNIA COASTAL RECORDS PROJECT, WWW.CALIFORNIACOASTLINE.ORG

Today the owners of the CEMEX Sand Mine in Marina will miss yet another deadline to formally respond to the California Coastal Commission.  The sand mine has been operating on the coast of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary without a permit, but the Commission only recently took action. 

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